Re: Stonestown Memories 1950's

03/12/05 - posted by Candis Smyk Hurlbut

I can see Stonestown has "upscaled". I remember seeing it for the first time as a new SF resident on 10 Ave. near GG Park in Spring 1956 (oh, no, it couldn't possibly be 49 years ago--I'm sure I'm only 38! ho ho ho). A next door neighbor, very old to me (probably in her late 60's or possibly early 70s--relatives, contact me if you want my memories of this wonderful lovely lady) Mrs. Blemio, took me with her. I returned home bubbling over about Stonestown. (It was sort of upscale back then.) I had never, as a recently transferred East Coast child, seen anything like it. Over the years I had trouble deciding if I preferred Stonestown over downtown SF. After Lowell High School moved to its now not so new location, I would walk over to Blum's, or windowshop at the stores, or even buy something. Then, in 1967, I married, and we lived in a Stonestown apartment for almost 3 years, before I snobbishly/snobbilly(!) decided it was overpriced, underfeatured, and we moved to Twin Peaks. (It also was overpriced and underfeatured, but the couple/(not a corporation)owners were wonderful, the view was amazing (sometime watch the shadows move, and it was surreal to look out the back window and see fog, while the view from the Peaks was sunny), and there weren't so many people making so much noise.) For a while, I enjoyed the total community aspect--everything was withing walking distance--even our Presbyterian church (does anyone remember that church?). I guess, like so many things I remember so well, everything, if not all, is now gone, except in my memories--which I am happy to share with you. If, 100 years from now, are reading this, and remember you saw a very thin young woman pushing a QFI grocery cart down the street, don't worry. It was legal then for the apartment dwellers to borow a cart as long as you pushed it back on your next trip, and pushing a grocery cart back in the 60s had a different meaning. It is I, just bringing my groceries home. Wave at me, I'll wave back--and wonder who you are!

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