Re: Serra and di Suervo homes - 43rd and Taraval

11/30/16 - posted by Zach


@Paul Nice! That's what's fascinating about Richard Serra's formative years: he was both a total jock (as was his brother Tony), with his "sports and steaks", and yet a highly perceptive and precociously skilled draftsman. (I love this story of the formation of his Artist identity: "When I was about in the third grade the teacher called my mother into the class, and they had all my drawings up around the top wall of the room, around the entire periphery, and the teacher pointed them out and said to my mother, 'You have to take this student to museums, you really have to encourage this.' And my mother took it very seriously. And thereupon whenever she introduced me she introduced me as 'Richard Serra the artist,' from a very young age. That pretty much determined what I was going to be and I enjoyed it. I thought, 'Fine, that's what I'm going to be.'") http://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2011/04/15/richard-serra-on-how-his-mother-fueled-his-early-art/

@Ann Interesting - thanks. Excelsior - still close to the ports :)

I was able to find more detailed info at the SFPL. The Serra residence was at 2351 43rd Avenue (with the di Suvero's literally a few doors down at 2343 43rd ave). The Serra home was built in 1944.

It really is such a cool bit of SF/Art History that both Serra and di Suvero came from the same block of the Outer Sunset. So much of the area is reflected in their work: the passing ships, waves and driftwood of di Suvero and the hull-steel, dune-slopes and surfer machismo of Serra. Another major artist, the painter Mary Heilmann was part of their Outer Sunset gang too. You could have a major museum with just these three!

Thanks again for the dialogue. Please share if you come across anything else!

Zach
suprah@mac.com

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